FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Jiu Jitsu, also known as “the gentle art”, is focused primarily on subduing your opponent through submission holds, chokes, and throws.  This allows for a jiu jitsu practitioner to end a fight more peacefully by controlling, and incapacitating their opponent without needing to rely on devastating hits.

This art teachers the principles of body mechanics, off balancing, escaping, countering, and attacking.

Jiu Jitsu evens the playing field between large and small fighters by employing the principle of “divide and conquer”.

Your opponent may be stronger than you, but your entire body is stronger than their single arm, or leg, or neck. Jiu Jitsu will teach you the skills to divide, isolate, and attack, so that you can fight smarter not harder.

We begin class with some light calisthenics and stretching. Following our warm-up we then begin drilling technique. These drills when done over and over help form muscle memory and help our students retain technique. After our drilling is completed then we begin to spar (or roll). Rolling is when students are able to put their techniques to the test with training partners who can resist and counter just as they would in an actual fight, providing valuable real-world experience should the techniques ever need to be applied in an actual fight.

Training with a gi on makes every move more complex and precise. Without the gi it is easier to simply slip out of positions, and use force to escape. However, when a gi is worn by both fighters the fight must slow down and become more technical. We encourage all students to develop their skills in gi before moving on to no gi. Starting with the gi will make a students technique much more clear and effective, and will make transitioning to no gi even easier.

Competition is encouraged for those who wish to do so but it is NOT a requirement. While there are many positive reasons for competing in tournaments, you will never be forced. However, over the years we have noticed that students who compete make huge improvements in their BJJ.

Belts go as follows: White, Blue, Purple, Brown, and Black. One of the main differences between BJJ and other martial arts is that it is hard to get promoted. At a blue belt level, you can almost be considered a lethal force. It will take commitment because we are committed to producing students with real ability. We do have a curriculum we go by to help you and once you exhibit competency in the techniques acquired you may qualify for a promotion.